Pine Ridge Gardens

....helping restore the earth

 
Sagittaria brevirostra Shortbeak arrowheadPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/partial shade Zones 3-9 Famly: Alismataceae
Growing arrowhead from seed wasn't near as challenging as I expected. Just put seed starter soil in tray with no holes, sprinkle the seed over the top and keep the soil saturated. so now we have lots of arrowhead to put in your pond or water garden. 1 to 3 feet with white flowers and deep green leaves.
Sagittaria latifolia     Arrowhead/duck potato
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/partial shade Zones 5-10 Famly: Alismataceae
Duck potato is a marginal aquatic with tuberous roots that are edible. Ducks & other waterfowl relish these tubers, native Americans boiled or baked them & consumed the tubers like potatoes. Duck potato can spread rapidly in your pond if it has a dirt bottom, so remove spent flowers if you don’t want this to happen. Bird food!
Attractive to Butterflies, Hummingbirds, and waterfowl.
Sagittaria papillosa Nipplebract arrowhead
out
Arkansas native
Sun/partial shade Zones 6-10 Famly: Alismataceae
This arrowhead/duck potato germinated very well last year & so if you need quantities, a tray of 32 will be $3.00 per pot. Flowers are about quarter sized & they produce lots of seed for ducks & other waterfowl.
Salvias belong to the family Lamiaceae & most of these are native to Texas or perhaps Mexico. All Salvia are beloved by butterflies, bees & hummingbirds. Most want good drainage & unfortunately are not hardy very far north (although there are exceptions).
Salvia azurea    Wild blue sage Photos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade Zone: 4-10 Family: Lamiaceae
The flowers are the color of a blue summer sky on robust plants that are very drought tolerant. The flowers are said to be somewhat larger on this species. Butterflies & hummingbirds.
Salvia darycii Just another fabulous red sage 
$sold out
North American native (Mexico)
Sun Zones 6-9 Family: Lamiaceae
Wow! The glowing red of these flowers make them appear almost irridescent. Small felty soft light green leaves have a triangular shape and are sticky to the touch (not stickery) Salvia darycii is one of those few long blooming perennials that make such a hit in the garden. Beloved by hummingbirds & butterflies. Average to dry soil
Salvia greggii 'Maraschino' Autumn sage
$sold out
Native
Sun Zones 6-10 Family: Lamiaceae
One of our few long blooming perennials. Beautiful deep pink flowers on this evergreen subshrub bloom from April to November. Hummingbirds flock to the flowers as well as butterflies & other flying critters. Average well drained soil. Don’t overwater.butterflies, bees & hummingbirds
Salvia greggii 'Pine Ridge Special' Autumn sagePhotos
$sold out
Native
Sun to light shade Zones 6-9 Family: Lamiaceae
Finally, here are some plants from the Salvia that is growing in the wall. It's been there at least 10 years & many of you have commented on it. Sometimes I seem to run out of words to describe how really good a plant is. If you have not grown any of the Salvia greggii varieties, and you have sunshine, and you live in zones 6-9, you have really missed a wonderful flowering sub-shrub. And if you live in colder zones, this makes a wonderful patio plant. Bring in to a cool garage in winter. These plants become woody & should NOT be cut back until after the last frost of spring. Deeply pink-red tubular flowers grace this selection & if you take a little time to deadhead, you will have flowers from May to October, sometimes even until December. If, like me, you are not into deadheading, you will have flowers most of the time from May to December :-)  Average to dry soil with good drainage. butterflies, bees & hummingbirds
Salvia penstemonoides Big red sagePhotos
$out of stock
Native
Sun/part shade Zones 6-10 at least Family: Lamiaceae
I'm so happy to be able to offer this salvia with the penstemon-like foliage again. The seed is scarce & not easily come by. This particular salvia has fuschia-colored flowers 1 1/2 inches or so long. The flower spike arises out of a basal rosette to about 3'. In only a few counties in Texas is this Salvia found. Butterflies & hummingbirds.
In the end we will conserve only what we love, we will love only what we understand, and we will understand only what we are taught.
Baba Dioum
Sanguinaria canadensis     Bloodroot
$12.00 Quart $15.00 3 Quart
Arkansas Native
Shade Zones: 3-9 Family: Papaveraceae
Thanks to Sid Vogelpohl for sharing this lovely native with me. Named bloodroot for the carmine-red root interior & juice which comes from it after being cut. Many petaled white flowers with yellow stamens appear in early spring.
Sarcostemma cynanchoides     Fringed twinevine
$out
Previously these were incorrectly identified. If you bought this plant in 2012, what you received was a Cynanchium instead. Still a milkweed vine and used by Monarchs.
Arkansas native
Part Sun Zones: 7-9 maybe colder Family: Asclepidaceae
Fragrant white flowers tinged in purple attract lots of butterflies to their nectar. Will climb on fences or shrubs- stems are up to 10 feet in length. Also host plant for Monarch & Queen butterflies.
Saururus cernuus   Lizard tail
$8.00 quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-10 Family: Saururuaceae
Lizard's tail is native to swamps & wetlands from Florida to Texas & northwards to Rhode Island & the west thru Michigan & Kansas. White fragrant flowers borne in dense racemes droop at the tips. Can be invasive in very wet areas. Butterflies
Want to know more about what you can plant in a wet area or near the edges of ponds or boggy areas? Check our wetlands page for more information.
Scrophularia marilandica    Late figwort
$8.00 quart
Arkansas native
 Shade/part shade Z: 4-9 Family: Scrophulariaceae
I’m growing late figwort this year because Alyne Eiland, of Tulsa, OK told me what a wonderful hummingbird attractant it is. The flowers are small, it’s true, but I must admit, I’ve seen lots of rubythroats feeding at the burgundy colored flowers. Apparently there is lots of nectar in those little flowers. At from 3 to 8 feet, this is not for the front of the border, but nestle one back with taller plants & enjoy the visits of rubythroats. Many other flying critters love the flowers too.
Scutellaria ovata  Woodland skullcap
$sold out
Arkansas native 
Shade/part shade Z: Family: Lamiaceae
Soft blue flowers on this woodland species. Soft felty leaves that are heart shaped. Good addition to your woodland garden.
Scutellaria suffrutescens 'Cherry Skullcap' Pink skullcapPhotos
$sold out
Texas native (maybe Mexico)
Sun Z: (6)7-9 Family: LamiaceaeA favorite of mine for the 10 or more years that it has been planted in my rock wall at the nursery! A very small neat mound with evergreen foliage (well, at least until the winter of 2009-10). Thankfully it has put on new deep green foliage & is covered with bright pink flowers again. Good drainage is a must.
Senecio aureus    Golden groundselPhotos
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteraceae
(Syn: Packera aurea) Bright golden flowers on this sweet native. Fairly low growing, so good for the front of the border or lovely in a meadow setting. Large deep green leaves - can get almost dinner plate size when happy.
Senecio obovatus   Wooly ragwort
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade/part sun Zone:3-8 Family: Asteraceae
Syn: Packera obovata - also known as squawweed, this early spring bloomer will capture your heart with its evergreen foliage & cheerful golden yellow flowers. Plant in morning sun or dappled shade.
Senecio tomentosus Wooly ragwort
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to light shade Zone:5-9, maybe colder Family: Asteraceae
Syn: Wooly ragwort is an early blooming perennial which grows in open fields & glades. Usually on 12 to 18” in height, it is quite showy in a large grouping. Syn: Packera tomentosa
Senna marilandica   Wild senna
   $15.00 #1  extra shipping  
Arkansas native
Sun Zones 5-8 Family: Caesalpinaceae
Syn: Cassia marilandica Bright yellow pea shaped flowers adron this senna. Plant toward the back of the border...or in the center of an island bed as this beauty can easily readh 4-5 feet in height. Deep green compound foliage is attractive all season. A host plant for the Cloudless sulphus and dogface sulfur butterflies.
Silene regia Royal catchflyPhotos
$summer 2017
Arkansas native
Sun Zone 5-8 Family: Caryophyllaceae
If you love RED flowers, this wonderful native is for you. Nickel sized bright red flowers on 3 foot stalks really draw the hummingbirds. Aveage to rocky soils. Thanks to Theo Witsell for seeds to grow these plants.
Silene stellata Starry campionPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Afternoon shade Zone 4-9 Family: Caryophyllaceae
Starry campion is native to almost all of the eastern half of the United States. The white fringed flowers are very attractive – plants usually reach 2 to 3 feet and do best in average soils without much organic matter. Bumblebees & a rare moth pollinate this wildflower.
Silene virginica Fire pinksPhotos
sold out
Arkansas native
Morning Sun, dappled light, or full shade Zones: 4-9 Family: Caryophyllaceae
Bright red flowers with the edges 'pinked' like being cut with a pinking shears (if anyone remembers that). Fire pinks require moist well drained soils to be the happiest. Unfortunately they like to bloom so much that they can almost bloom themselves to death, so remove the spent flowers if you can to prevent most of the seed formation & you should have this around for a good while. The rosettes of foliage seem to be evergreen at least here in Zone 7.
Silphium asteriscus Starry rosinweed
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun Zones 6-9 at least Family: Asteraceae
Excellent choice for your butterfly garden. 3-4'  Yellow flowers which tell you that these are closely related to sunflowers. Seed of choice for goldfinch. In researching this plant, I learned lots of interesting things about the Silphium clan. For example, the rootstock on an established one can be 10 to 15 feet into the ground. WOW! It's no wonder they become drought tolerant. Asteriscus is Greek for 'Little Star', named apparently for the many starlike flowers. These plants are from seed Larry Lowman collected near Harrison, AR. Thanks Larry!
The ultimate test of man's conscience may be his willingness to sacrifice something today for future generations whose words of thanks will not be heard."— Gaylord Nelson
Silphium integrifolium    RosinweedPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to light shade Zones 5-9 Family: Asteraceae 
Thanks to Theo Witsell for seeds this time. Rosinweed doesn't get quite as large as some of the other Silphiums, perhaps only half as tall (to about 4 to 7').. Like the other Silphiums, Rosinweed makes a resinous sap, that can be chewed, although I don't recommend it. I suggest you just grow it for the pure pleasure of looking at the flowers, and for the butterflies
Silphium laciniatum     Compass plantPhotos
summer 2017
Arkansas native
Sun/light shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteraceae
A classic prairie plant. At maturity a well developed plant may have up to 100 flowers over its bloom time.. Often 6-8'. Birds love the seeds. Butterflies
He who plants a garden, plants happiness!  old Chinese proverb
Silphium perfoliatum Cup Plant
summer 2017
CAN NOT SHIP TO CONNECTICUT
Arkansas native
Sun/light shade Zones 3-9 Family: Asteraceae
The opposite leaves encircle the square stem forming a cup that may hold water after a rain. Each flower has 20 -30 yellow rays & a darker yellow center disc. May get up to 8'. Range is from Ontario to South Dakota, southward to Georgia & west to Oklahoma. Butterflies
Silphium speciosum    Wholeleaf rosinweed
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun Zones 4-9 family: Asteraceae
Thanks to Art Evans for the seeds to grow these plants. The seed came from NW Arkansas prairie. Sturdy upright stems hold aloft bright yellow flowers in late summer. Excellent for pollinators and seed eating birds. Drought tolerant once established. Synonym: Silphium integrifolium v. laeve.
Silphium terebinthinaceum   Prairie dock
$8.00 Quart     $12.00 3 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteraceae
What a tongue twister for a name! What a delightful wildflowers! Very large spatulate leaves arise in springtime & in late fall, a flower stem shoots up maybe 4 to 6'. Likes dry rocky areas. Butterflies& BIRDS TOO!
Sisyrinchium angustifolium Blue Eyed GrassPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zone: 3-9 Family: Iridaceae
This diminutive member of the iris family will delight you with its bright blue star shaped flowers with gold centers. Growing only 10-12" tall, it is perfect for borders, edgings & beside pathways. Blue eyed grass seems to be deer resistant. Various birds eat the seed.
Sium suave Water parsnipPhotos
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zone 5-9 Family: Apiaceae
Crowned with large white flowers, this wetland species has parsley-like foliage & grows to 4' or more. It is found from Virginia to Florida & west to Missouri & Arkansas. Seed from the Shaw Arboretum. Host plant for Eastern Black Swallowtail Butterfly.
Smallanthus uvedalius Yellow flowered leafcup
sold out    
Arkansas native
Shade Zone 5-9 Family: Asteracea
When you first come upon this plant, you wonder if it is some kind of strange maple with huge maple shaped leaves. On closer inspection, you see that it isn’t woody at all. Later, you observe lots of bright yellow flowers – maybe 1” across. Not tolerant of extreme drought. Butterflies
Solidago is also of the Asteraceae family. Goldenrods have certainly been given a bad rap over the years as a cause of hay fever. Well folks, it just ain't so! Goldenrod pollen is too heavy to be windborne, it's just unfortunate that ragweed blooms at the same time, thus causing all the trouble. For me it is hard to imagine a late summer & fall garden without the glorious yellows of goldenrod. Goldenrod is also important to provide nectar for butterflies in the fall season & seeds for the birds in winter.
Solidago arguta   Cutleaf goldenrod
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Pt sun/dappled light Z: 3-9 Family: Asteraceae
Another lovely native for fall bloom & nectar for those thirsty butterflies. Usualy height 2-3'. Birds & butteflies.
Solidago auriculata   Eared goldenrod
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Shade to part sun Z: 3-9 Family: Asteraceae
Eared goldenrod is found in lightly shaded areas and could likely take more sun with more moist conditions. 2 – 3’. Generally found in the Ouachitas along stream & river terraces. Another good pollinator plant. Seed thanks to Brent Baker.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river been poisoned and the last fish been caught will we realize we cannot eat money. - Cree Indian Proverb
Solidago buckleyi   Buckley's goldenrod
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Shade Z: 6-8 guessing Family: Asteraceae
Buckley’s goldenrod is an uncommon species with a small range, mostly in the Ozark Mountains & the uplands near the Mississippi and Ohio confluence. Generally in oak forest, it may reach 48”. Butterflies & Bees. Thanks to the Shaw Nature Reserve for this seed.
Solidago caesia   wreath goldenrod
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to shade Zones 3-10 Family: Asteraceae
Often found in wooded areas wreath goldenrod is a very delicate & lovely plant. Height from about 30 - 36" and is found from Florida to Texas & northward to Quebec. Very tolerant of a wide range of soils & soil conditions. butterflies
Solidago drummondii Cliff goldenrodPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun part shade Z: 5-8 Family: Asteraceae

Usually arching out over cliffs, the stems are 20 to 36" long with golden yellow flowers scattered over the upper branches. Commonly found on ledges & cliffs & dolomite bluffs throughout the Ozarks. At least zone 5. butterflies
Solidago flexicaulis Broadleaf goldenrod or Zig-Zag goldenrod
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 3-10 Family: Asteracea
Zig-Zag goldenrod is native over a wide portion of the U.S. fraom Louisiana to the Dakotas & east to Maine & southward to Georgia. Delicate yellow flowers draw butterflies & other flying critters.
"To forget how to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget ourselves" ~ Mahatma Gandhi ~
Solidago gattingeri   Gattinger' goldenrod
$out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zone 5-9 Family: Asteracea
Range of the native goldenrod is the limestone glades & bald knobs the Ozark region north to St Louis county. Erect slender stems rise to a leafless inflorescence of pyramidal shape. Records indicate hardy to northern Illinois. Butterflies
 
Solidago nemoralis  Old field goldenrodPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteracea
Arching sprays of golden flowers top this lovely native which makes its home along dry open fields, roads, glades & open woods throughout most of the eastern half of the U.S. Zones 4-9 at least. Thanks again to the Shaw Nature Reserve for the seed. Butterflies
The sun has shone on the earth, and the goldenrod is his fruit. 30 August 1853, Henry David Thoreau
 
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Solidago odora  Sweet goldenrod
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to partial shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteracea
This well behaved goldenrod has many common names - Anise-scented goldenrod, fragrant golderod and so on. The leaves are very fragrant & may be used to make a tea. Showy golden yellow flowers appear in late summer & fall. Pollinator plant. butterflies & hummingbirds
Solidago patula  Rough leaf goldenrod
$8.00 Quart
Native Sun to part shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteracea
Rough leaf goldenrod has large leaves perhaps the largest I've seen for goldenrod. If you have a swampy area or poorly drained spot that just stays wet, this goldenrod is for you. Native from Vermont to Ontario & south to Georgia & other southern states. Butterflies
Solidago petiolaris
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 5-10 at least Family: Asteracea
Native to eastern U.S. & the midwest as well, Solidago petiolaris has very attractive larger flowers than many goldenrods & also the flowers show up as individuals, rather than as clusters. The most uncommon fact is the flowers are white.  Butterflies
Solidago radula
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 5-10 Family: Asteracea
Just one more goldenrod! Another lovely yellow flowers to brighten the fall days & help feed hungry butterflies!
Solidago riddellii   Riddell's goldenrod
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade Z: 3-7 Family: Asteracea
Riddell's goldenrod is a goldenrod of special concern in Arkansas as it is uncommon. Very narrow leaves give rise to flat topped clusters of yellow flowers. A wetland species, Riddell's goldenrod is very attractive to bees of all sorts as well as butterflies.
Solidago rigida   Stiff goldenrodPhotos
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun Zone 5-9 Family: Asteracea
Stiff goldenrod is my favorite goldenrod. With outstanding foliage & large flowers, it is well behaved and makes a very good plant for the garden. Some goldenrods tend to be thugs & want to run all over, but this is a clumping form. Thanks to Theo Witsell for seed.
Solidago rugosa   Rough stemmed goldenrodPhotos
$8.00 quart $12.00 3 quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade Zones 3-8 Family: Asteracea
I find the leaves & shape of this goldenrod particularly attractive. It also likes a moist site. Native over most of the eastern U S, it may colonize where happy. Butterflies
Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrodPhotos
$8.00 Quart    $12.00  3 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Z: 3-9 Family: Asteracea
Shorter than some goldenrods at 2-3', showy goldenrod is very attractive in its late summer dress of yellow. A rhizomatous perennial, it is at home in dry soils in fields & meadows. Butterflies & other flying critters!
Solidago uliginosa Bog goldenrod
$SOLD OUT
Native
Sun/pt shade Z: 4-9 Family: Asteracea
Bog goldenrod is native from Ontario to Georgia, from Maine to Minnesota & most states in between.. Deep green linear leaves give rise to golden yellow flowers.
I have learned silence from the talkative; tolerance from the intolerant and kindness from the unkind. I should not be ungrateful to those teachers. ~ Kahlil Gibran
Solidago ulmifolia Elm leaved goldenrod
$8.00     Quart
Seeds for this uncommon goldenrod came from the Shaw Nature Reserve. I continue to be indebted to them for the wealth & diversity of seed materials. Native from Nova Scotia to Texas so probably zones 3 to 10. Found along dry rocky woods & along bluffs & thickets. Butterflies
Condition of plants excellent!
Everything arrived as ordered and on time too!
Thanks. VL
Spigelia marilandica   Indian pinksPhotos
$15.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Shade, part shade, sun Zones 4-9 Family: Loganaceae
Probably the most spectacular of the eastern native wildflowers, with 1-2" long tubular flowers of crimson that split open at the end of the tube to offer a starry yellow center, obviously designed to draw hummingbirds in. Spigelia takes a while to grow & settle in to your garden, so don't rush it. While I see lots of information about what these plants like, I can tell you that they grow in dark dry woods, in moist open woods & in full sun. I suggest that you just pop them in the ground without disturbing their roots, (I know what you've been told) and just mostly leave them alone. Water when dry until they get established. Spigelia contains spigeleine, which is an anthelmintic (a worm expelling drug). Overdoses of this can be fatal. Butterflies
Spiranthes cernua v. odorata    Ladies tresses orchid
$summer 2017
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade Zones 3-8 Family: Orchidaceae
Only a few of these lovely native orchids to offer this year. If you will plant them in moist organically enriched soil, you will be rewarded with them multiplying nicely. The Ladies tresses orchids have snowy white flowers that twist around the stalk. This species have sweetly scented flowers.
Stokesia laevis    Stokes AsterPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native?
Sun/part shade Zone 5-9 Family: Asteracea
Since these are seed grown plants, I can tell you that they will be a lovely shade of blue - perhaps purple. You'll love Stokes Aster for its large flowers & because it is attractive to butterflies & other flying critters. A lovely undemanding native.
Stokesia laevis 'Honeysong Purple' Stokes aster
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade Z: 5-9 Family: Asteracea
Rich deep purple flowers with a lighter center hover on stems about 14" above the dark green foliage. Flowers on mature plants are 4" across. Butterflies & hummingbirds
Stokesia laevis 'Peachie's Pick' Stoke's aster
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade Z: 6-9 Family: Asteracea
This selection of Stoke's Aster has bluer flowers the the above Honeysong Purple. The flowers are quite large 3 - 4" and blooms for a long time. Please give them good drainage & you'll be rewarded with years of pleasure. Bloom time starts in late May.
Stylophorum diphyllum Celandine poppy
$out of stock
Arkansas native
Morning sun/shade Zones 4-8 Family: Paveraceae
Native to rich moist woods, Celandine poppy will reward you with bright yellow flowers in mid spring if you give it a reasonable bit of care when planting. Happiest under deciduous trees, this wood poppy will self seed & you'll have a colony of them if you wish! They are so lovely, most people wish! (otherwise pick off the seed pods when they form) Shade
Talinum calycinum   Rock pinkPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 6-8 at least Family: Portulacaceae
Succulent leaves make this sweet native very drought tolerant - suitable for tucking into rock walls or rock gardens. A small plant with bright fuchsia flowers that open in the afternoon on stems 8-10" in height.
Tephrosia virginiana    Goat's rue
$ out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4 to 9 Family: Fabaceae
Some common names are really strange. Do you imagine if a goat ate this plant that it would rue the day? An underused native perennial that is very attractive both in foliage & flower. Very showy flowers of pink to mauve & yellow. Acidic, fairly poor soil is needed for success. Goat's Rue will thrive in sandy or rocky soil and will even grow in clay. Once established, it resents transplanting. Quail & wild turkey eat the seeds. Native from the dunes of NH to the dry open woods of Wisconsin, Arkansas & Texas. . Full sun to ˝ day or lightly dappled shade. Goat's rue is difficult to grow in pots as it resents the extra moisture that often collects around its roots, SO PLEASE PLANT THEM RIGHT AWAY.
Teucrium canadense     American Germander
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade Zones 3-10 Family: Lamiaceae
Many of you know the germander from Europe but are unaware of the native species. Very hardy - even withstands being munched down & rebounds to flower with spires of lavender pink flowers. Unusual flowers are quite showy on this well behaved member of the mint family. The lower corolla lobe is large & makes an excellent landing platform for insects with spots on the lobe as guides. Excellent for a lighly wooded area or a spot with afternoon shade -18 to 36" Really deserves to be brought into cultivation.
Thalia dealbata Powdery thalia
$Inquire
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 6-11 Family: Marantaceae
The foliage of this water lover reminds me of cannas. Thalia has a lovely interesting purple bloom which is followed by long lasting purple seeds. Native to Missouri, Arkansas & states south this striking water plant is underused. Part of the reason I feel is that Thalia has been misrepresented in the trade as to hardiness. Since it is native in Missouri, it's obvious to me that it must be hardy to at least zone 6. Planted in a pond, Thalia will get to a height of 6 - 8' or more. It spreads slowly, forming a copse of stems that birds love to hide in, especially in winter. Tiny fishes, frogs & other critters find protection from bigger critters among the stems of Thalia.
The frog does not drink up the pond in which it lives. - Chinese Proverb
Thalictrum dasycarpum   Purple meadow ruePhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Morning sun /open shade Zones 3-10 Family: Ranunculaceae
One of the problems with common names is that they often don't mean what most people think they mean. (which causes misunderstandings :-) ) With this plant, the purple means the stems are usually purple - the flowers are actually white! Irregardless, it is a nice native for the partialy shaded garden with average to good soil. Not drought tolerant.
Thalictrum dioicum    Early Meadow Rue
$
Arkansas native
Shade/part sun Z: 4-7 Family: Ranunculaceae
Early meadowrue grows to about 18" having lacey scalloped leaves that are reminiscent of columbines. Nodding greenish-white flowers with a purple cast appear in mid spring. Average soil conditions.
Tradescantia or spiderwort is in the Commelinaceae (dayflower) family. With wide grassy foliage, there is a number of native species for sun & for part shade. Most will thrive on poor rocky soil.
Tradescantia bracteata   Long-bract spiderwort
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun Zone 4-9 Family: Commelinaceae
With rose to purple flowers, this spiderwort is also one of the shorter ones, gowing 12-18" with blooms from May to July. May be more suited for wild areas as the foliage doesn't look its best after flowering.
Tradescantia hirsuticaulis     Hairy stem spiderwort
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Z: 6-9 Family: Commelinaceae
A low-growing, compact spiderwort with deep purple, three parted flowers. The long, narrow leaves of this 1 feet clump-forming spiderwort are fuzzy.
Tradescanti longipes    Wild crocus spiderwort
$10.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Part shade Z: 4-9 Family: Commelinaceae
This lovely diminutive spiderwort is only found in the Ozark Mountains on rocky wooded slopes. Deep blue to purple flowers are borne in clusters usually from May to June. About 8" tall.
Tradescantia ohioensis   Ohio spiderwortPhotos
$8.00 quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-8 Family: Commelinaceae
An early flowering spiderwort with clear blue flowers. Native range is most of the eastern half of the U.S. Foliage is quite attractive in this species with a lot of purple in it in cooler weather.
Do you know that hummingbirds eat insects? That they feed the babies insects? What happens when you kill all the insects? Do you know that the biggest part of the diet of many songbirds is bugs? Sure, lots of birds eat seed…..but lots of birds only eat insects or only supplement their diet with seed.
Tradescantia occidentalis 'Mrs. Loewer"
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade Zone 4-8 Family: Commelinaceae
Mrs. Loewer spiderwort was discovered on a prairie in eastern Arkansas & brought into the nursery world by Larry Lowman. Mrs. Loewer spiderwort likes the sun & has light blue flowers over narrow leaves which turn to a smoky purple in fall & winter.
Tradescantia subaspera     ZigZag SpiderwortPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 5-9 Family: Commelinaceae
While Zigzag spiderwort is growing in full sun here at the nursery, most sites recommend partial shade. This spiderwort has lovely light blue flowers with a touch of orchid, that just keep on coming for weeks it seems. Not as aggressive as T. ohioensis – Height between 2 & 3 feet.
Tradescantia tharpii Tharp's spiderwort
$sold out
Arkansas(?) native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-8 Family: Commelinaceae
For the front of the border or tucked in front of shrubs, Tharp's spiderwort is darling. At less than 12" it is sometimes called shortstem spiderwort. The flowers are an intense blue-purple; sometimes rose colored. Native to a small number of states in the midwest.
Tradescantia virginiana Virginia spiderwort
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade/pt sun Z: 4-9 Family: Commelinaceae
Virginia spiderwort usually has blue flowers but can be rose colored or even white. The stems get to about 30" with the bloom time being late spring into summer. Average soils & moisture becoming more drought tolerant upon becoming established.
Verbena hastata Blue vervain
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade Z: 3-9 Family: Verbenaceae
The name, blue vervain is strange because the flowers are more purple than blue. A wetland species, Blue vervain loves to grow on pond edges, wet ditches & other places where the soil is moist. From 2 to 5 feet, blue vervain attracts butterflies and other pollinating insects. Seed – thanks to Theo Witsell.
Verbesinas are in the Asteraceae family & are known by several common names; some for a specific species & others such as frostweed are used to denote the uncommon practice the Verbesinas share of producing frostflowers in the fall after a fairly hard frost. Also sometimes known as wingstem because the stems are usually squared off with with leaf tissue extending along the stem.
Verbesina alternaefolia   Yellow ironweedPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones Family: Asteraceae
A darling late blooming native, the ray flowers on this verbesina are yellow & reflexed backwards so it looks as if the cone portion is thrusting forward. A tough drought tolerant native to continue to provide nectar for butterflies in the fall; as well as providing seeds for birds in winter.
Verbesina helianthoides   Yellow crownbeardPhotos
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Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zone 4-8 Family: Asteraceae
Butterflies love all the Verbesinas. This species blooms the earliest, usually starting in June with golden-yellow flowers. Quite drought tolerant once established. 
Verbesina virginica   White crownbeardPhotos
$8.00 quart 
Arkansas native
Sun/shade Zones 5-9 Family: Asteracea
Occurs natively in rocky open woods, along streams & thickets from Florida to Texas & north to PA. Bloom time is generally from August to October with many critters loving the nectar produced. Butterflies
Vernonia , or ironweed is in the Asteraceae family. This is probably what you see in the fall as you are driving on country roads. Lovely purple flowers that often have butterflies clustering around them. Quite hardy plants. Native to a wide area of the United States.Vernonias generally have purple flowers & are called ironweed by most folks. There are a few mutants out there with white flowers, or so I'm told, but I have not seen them for myself.
Vernonia arkansana    Arkansas ironweedPhotos
$sold out   
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-8 Family: Asteracea
Large flower heads of purple & long curled bracts with slender willow-like leaves characterize this ironweed. Usually grows to about 3 feet in the wild but if you give it good garden soil, it may reach 5'. at least I've noticed that while established plants can take a good bit of drought, moisture really makes them happy. Butterflies
Vernonia baldwinii    Baldwin's Ironweed
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun or shade Z: 5-9 Family: Asteracea
One of the earliest ironweeds to flower, it helps provide the succession of bloom needed to assure a constant supply of nectar for bees, butterflies & other nectar feeding critters. Found from Minnesota to Texas. Baldwin's ironweed is very drought tolerant once established & will grow in the sun or dappled shade.
Vernonia gigantea (Syn: V. altissima) Tall ironweed
$8.00  quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 3-10 Family: Asteracea
I see this lovely native ironweed along roads & byways throughout Arkansas - it is native to a wide area of the U.S., going all the way northeastward to Massachusetts! Rosy purple flowers usually start blooming in August - likes moisture but does become fairly drought tolerant once established. Another nectar plant for butterflies!
Vernonia lettermanii 'Iron Butterfly'ppaf Letterman's ironweed
$10.00 Quart    
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 4-9 Family: Asteracea
This is it folks! The ironweed that masquerades as Arkansas blue star (Amsonia hubrichtii) .... until it blooms in late July or August & then there's no mistaking it. Bright purple blooms at the end of each stem or branch - nearly a hundred on a 3 year plant. Drought tolerant, likes poor soil, 24-36" tall, carefree, butterfly nectar - what more could you ask of a plant! For all of you who have asked for this spectatular ironweed, I've finally been able to grow enough to offer these for sale. Butterflies!!
Vernonia missurica Missouri IronweedPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zones 3-9 Family: Asteracea
Lovely bright purple flowers atop this native ironweed which occurs in moist open fields as well as wooded areas. The native range is from Ontario to Arkansas, Texas & eastwards. Butterflies
Veronicastrum virginicum Culver's rootPhotos
Quart $8.00 
Arkansas native
Sun Zones 4-9 Family: Scrophulariaceae
Spires of white flowers arise in early to mid summer providing a vertical accent in your garden. Butterflieshummers find them quite attractive. To about 3', maybe more.  Surprise, surprise, some plants bloomed with lavendar flowers.
"All I require of society, in the matter of gardening, is a decent awareness that gardeners have a greater stake in society than others, and an occasional reflection that no life is worth living without a vine and a fig tree."  Henry Mitchell in One Man's Garden
Viola pedata Bird's foot violet
$sold out 
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zone 4-8 Family: Violaceae
One of the lovely signs of spring which defies the old adage - shrinking violet. This plant is tough! In fact, most people are apt to 'kill it with kindness'. Full sun to light shade, often found along roadsides in poor dry rocky soil. Native from Louisiana to Connecticut.
Viola walteri Silver Gem Walter's violetPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade Zone: 6-8 Family: Violaceae
Silver Gem is a selection of Walter's violet that has more silvery colored foliage than usual. Sort of dark green with a silvery overlay. Delicate violet flowers barely hover above the foliage. Walter's violet is not an aggresive violet like some we could name, but reather slowly expands as a natural groundcover. Host for Diana fritillary.
Waldsteinia fragarioides Barren Strawberry
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade/ pt sun Zones: 4-7 Family: Rosacea
An excellent groundcover with semi-evergreen leaves and small yellow flowers in mid spring. Barren strawberry grows 3 to 6" tall and spreads by creeping stolons.
Woodwardia virginica Virginia chain fern
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade Zone 3-10 Family: Blechnaceae
Virginia chain fern is a great native landscaping fern for those tough areas with moist or saturated soils. Spreading quickly, it provides a dense, weed-resistant groundcover in damp sites or sunny pond edges. It also is beautiful and less assertive in average garden conditions. 18-24" tall by 30" wide.
Zephyranthus are called fairy lilies or rain lilies and are in the Amarylliidaceae family. Beautiful crocus-like flowers pop out of the ground throughout late summer into fall. Seemly after a good rain, which is the reason I guess for calling them rainlilies. Unfortunately most are not hardy north of zone 7, and some are only marginally hardy in zone 7. So far, all species we have for sale have proved hardy here. They are so lovely and easy to grow, that I suggest people in more northern places, grow them in a pot & bring them inside in winter. Full sun to light shade. Mostly front of border type. 3 to 8".
Zephyranthus candida    Rain lily
Not native
Sun to light shade zones 6b-10 Family: Liliaceae
Glistening white tubular blooms on semi-evergreen grassy foliage. A treat for the border in your garden. 
Zephyranthus chlorosolen (Syn: Cooperia drummondii) Fragrant rainlily
$12.00  Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/light shade Zones 6-10 Family: Liliaceae
This is beautiful! Blooming late in the year on dry rocky glades, this sweetly fragrant rainlily has a totally different shape flower from Z. Candida (listed above). Unfortunately there is much confusion in the trade over names of rainlilies, with Z. candida being sold for other white flowered rainlilies.
Zephyranthes texanaPhotos 
$8.00 Quart  $6.00 3" pot
Native
Sun to part shade Zones 7-11 Family: Amaryllidaceae
Another species that suffers from botanical squabbling. I have bought this lovely rainlily under several different names. H. tubispathus, H. robustus v. texana as well as the above name. Irregardless of name, I love this rainlily for its golden yellow crocus-like blooms that are painted with bronze on the outside of the petals.
Walk softly on the face of the earth
Zizia aptera Heartleaf alexanders
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade Zone 3-8 Family: Apiaceae
Heartleaf alexanders have heart-shaped basal leaves which is the best way to distinguish them from Golden Alexanders. Height 2-3' with deep yellow-gold flowers in umbels. A host plant for the eastern black swallowtail butterfly.
Zizia aurea Golden alexanders
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Shade to part sun Zones 4-9 Family: Apiaceae
Golden umbels adorn this carrot family member. Larval food plant for Eastern black swallowtail, nectar plant for all butterflies. Likes moist soils & is good for naturalizing
"The old Lakota was wise. He knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to lack of respect for humans too." ~~ Luther Standing Bear