Pine Ridge Gardens

....helping restore the earth

 
 
Baptisias or false indigo belongs to the family Fabaceae. These are all long lived, drought tolerant, outstanding natives. Most of the Baptisias thrive in full sun and will tolerate some shade. Fabaceae is the bean family & you will recognize the lovely foliage & pea shaped flowers if you've ever observed a garden with peas growing in it.
Baptisia alba v macrophylla  Wild white indigoPhotos
$10.00 Quart
Arkansas Native
Full sun to half day. Zones 4-10  Family: Fabaceae
Also known as Baptisia leucantha, as well as Baptisia alba alba, this native is found from Mississippi to Ontario & westward to Nebraska & south to Texas. Generally the tallest of the species at about 5";. Very upright foliage with beautiful white flowers.  More beautiful with each year.   Kevin Goodwin just let me know that Bombus pensylvanicus (Pensylvania bumblebee) prefers this as a food plant.  We need to help the bees!
Baptisia alba v pendula   Wild false indigo
Native
 $12.00 Quart
Full sun     Zones 5-9.    Family: Fabaceae
There are at least two wild white indigos.  The growth habit & bloom time are different.  Baptisia alba v. pendula blooms earlier than Baptisia leucantha(or Baptisia alba v. alba) & is more compact - about 3' in height as opposed to 4' or more with B. leucantha.  Here at the nursery, Baptisia pendula is planted in a clay bank that is visible when you first drive up & for about a month in early spring, every person who visits asks about it.  With smokey purple stems that appear almost black at times, it's a knockout.  Then pristine white pea-shaped flowers appear, followed by charcoal seed pods which droop from the stems - thus the name pendula! 
Baptisia australis   Wild blue indigoPhotos
$10.00 Quart
Native
Sun to part shade   Zones 5-8 at least  Family: Fabaceae
Baptisias or wild indigos or false indigos, whatever you wish to call them, are a mainstay in the dry gardens.  With taproots that go deep into the ground, they can waltz through drought witout batting a leaf!  Drop dead blue flowers arise in late spring, reminiscent of Lupine flowers (they are related you know).
Baptisia 'Carolina Moonlight'
 $15.00 3 Quart size
Native Hybrid
Sun to part shade  Zones 5-8 at least  Family: Fabaceae
This lovely pale yellow Baptisa has all the wonderful traits of drought tolerance & long life that we have come to know & love about the false wild indigos.
Baptisia 'Dutch Chocolate'
$few available for pickup
Native Hybrid
Sun   Zone 4-9  Family: Fabaceae
Baptisias are deer-resistant and this one is simply stunning with its deep purple/black buds which turn to a Chocolate brown.  Long live and drought tolerant.  30"
Baptisia Lemon Meringue
 a few available for pickup
Native Hybrid
Sun  Zone 4-9  Family: Fabaceae
At 3 feet tall, this Baptisia hybrid fits well into the garden.  Dark yellow flowers on purple stalks.  Drought tolerant.
Baptisia leucantha see Baptisia alba v. macrocarpa
Baptisia leucophaea     Nodding wild indigoPhotos
Arkansas native
$12.00 Quart
Full sun to afternoon shade to dappled shade. Zones 5-9 at least
This lovely baptisia goes under several names while botanists fight over what is the correct name. This seems to be the most commonly accepted botanical name so that is what I call it. Names aside, Nodding wild indigo is a lovely plant standing only a foot or so tall & the flower heads gracefully droop to the side. If planted on a hillside, the flowers usually droop to the low side.  Butterflies.
Baptisia minor    Small false blue indigo
$12.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun    Zones 3-8   Family: Fabaceae
Blue pea-shaped flowers ornament this shorter member of the Baptisia genus, 1 1/2 to 2'.    Tough, drought tolerant plants that just get bigger & better each year.  Baptisias often take up to 3 years to bloom.
Baptisia nuttalliana       Nuttall's false indigo
$12.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun - some shade    Zones: 6-9  maybe colder   Family: Fabaceae
Collected some seed from a large population of these plants last year in SW Arkansas.  Nuttall's false indigo is different from the others with its flowers being interspersed with the foliage.  Quite a lovely plant - usually about 24 to 30".  Yellow flowers, softer in color than Baptisia sphaeracarpa.  
 
Baptisia pendula  - see Baptisia alba v pendula
 
Baptisia sphaeracarpa   Wild yellow indigoPhotos
$sold out until fall 2017
Arkansas native
Sun     Zones 5-10 at least    Family: Fabaceae
Bright sunshine yellow are the flowers of this hardy baptisia. Even when the mowers cut it down, it persists to come another year. Full sun. 24 - 36" tall.   Native to Arkansas (where I collected the seed on the side of the road in Franklin County) & Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma & Texas. Butterflies.

"Only good men weep. If a man has not wept at the world's pain, he is less than the dirt he walks upon because dirt will nourish seed, root, stalk, leaf and flower, but the spirit of a man without pity is barren and will bring forth nothing." Faulkner

Baptisia 'Midnight Prairie Blues'  PP#20432
$sold out
Native hybrid
Sun   Zone 3-9    Family: Fabaceae
False wild indigo is a very long lived plant which only gets better with age.  Deep blue-violet flowers are amazing spikes and as an added bonus, side shoots begin to flower also, extending the bloom.
Baptisia Twilight Prairie Blues PP#19011    Wild indigo
 $15.00  2 Quart
Native hybrid
Full sun    Zones 4-8     Family: Fabaceae
Twilight Prairie Blues is a hybrid between B. australis & B. sphaeracarpa perpetrated by the Chicago Botanic Garden.  A beautiful & vigorous  wild indigo that is 30 to 36" tall & the flowers are violet purple with a yellow keel.  Average to dry soil.  Baptisias are long lived perennials that resist owner planticide unless you keep them too wet.  Cut back foliage in February or early March. Butterflies.
Berlandiera texana  Green EyesPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade   Z: 6(5) to 9   Family: Asteracea
Green eyes is a lovely tough native with an extremely long bloom period. With a green center & buttery yellow petals, Green eyes really draws the butterflies. Drought tolerant and as an added bonus, a sweet vanilla fragrance on a nice sunny day.
Blephilia ciliata     horsemint - wood mint
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Afternoon shade    Zones 4-8  Family: Lamiaceae
I love this darling member of the mint family & have wanted to offer it for several years but was unable to secure enough seed.   !  It looks like purple pom poms on a stick.  One ball shaped head of flowers - a bit of stem and another ball shaped head of flowers.  12 to 30"
Blephilia hirsuta     Hairy Wood Mint
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native  Part shade  Z: 4-8   Family: Lamiaceae
Wood mint is nice for the wild garden, particularly in wooded areas although it will grow in full sun.  Little pom-pom type flower heads are blue or purple & hummingbirds love them.  Plant height is from 12 to 30".
Callirhoe or poppy mallows or wine cups,  belong to the family Malvaceae. They form a large tuberous root & can take quite dry conditions. They do, however, seem to resent root disturbance & don't want their crown covered. Well drained soil is necessary. Beautiful & long lived.
Callirhoe bushii    Bush's poppy mallowPhotos
$8.00 Quart 
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade   Z: 5-9    Family: Malvaceae
This rare poppy mallow is native to only 4 states & is found growing in rocky open woods & in glade borders.  Very drought tolerant, Bush's poppy mallow is more upright than the following species - reach 12-18" tall.  Beautiful magenta cupped flowers approximately 1 1/2 to 2" across.  Do not plant in richly amended soils or where the soil stays wet.
Callirhoe involucrata    Purple poppy mallowPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade   Zones 4-9  Family: Malvaceae
Hardy, long lived & extremely drought tolerant are features that make this a good plant.  The wine colored blooms of about half dollar size that bloom for a long time in late spring & summer make this a outstanding plant.  Good drainage & sun are its main requirements. 
Cassia marilandica     Wild senna
$10.00 Quart
Arkansas Native
Sun to part shade   Zone 5-8 at least  Family: Fabaceae
Bright yellow pea shaped flowers adorn wild senna!  Plant toward the back of the border .... Or in the center of an island bed as this beauty can easily reach 4-5' in height.  Deep green compound foliage is attractive all season.  A host plant for the Cloudless sulphus & dogface sulfur butterflies.  Synonym:  Senna marilandica.
Chelanthes lanosa     Hairy Lip Fern
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade Z: 5-8  Family: Pteridaceae
Hairy lip fern is a small soft textured fern with fuzzy green leaflets along a chestnut colored stipe.  At 6-8", it is great for along a rock wall or trough.  Very drought tolerant once established, it will take more sun than most ferns.
Cimicifuga racemosa   Black Cohosh
$Sold out
Arkansas native
Shade to morning sun   Zones 4-8    Family:  Ranunculaceae
Spires of white flowers adorn this native herb which has been used medicinally for decades.  Attractive foliage on this 3-5" plant.   Does not tolerate drought.
Cooperia drummondii    Evening rain lily
  $12.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/pt shade  Z: 6-10 Family: Amaryllidaceae
Synonym: Zephyranthes chlorosolem
This rain lily is the purest white with deep dark green grassy foliage - more onion-like than grass-like.  Cooperia is on the ANHC plants of special concern list.  Cooperia naturalizes well in a grassy lawn or meadow.
Coreopsis belong to the family Asteraceae. Asteraceae meaning composite as usually the flowers are made up of disc flowers (the center of the flower) & ray flowers (the petals). Coreopsis usually bloom over a fairly long period & are attractive to butterflies.
Coreopsis grandiflora    Large flowered coreopsisPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun  Zones: 4-9  Family: Asteraceae
Coreopsis grandiflora does well in heavy soils with full sun and dry conditions.  Where happy, it may form colonies because of its rhizomatous roots.  An easy plant to grow with few problems.  Pollinator plant!
Coreopsis lanceolata   Lance leaf coreopsis
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun  Z: 4-9  Family: Asteraceae    Native to much of this country, lance leaf coreopsis is known to most everyone with the cheerful yellow daisy-like flowers dancing in the wind.  Best grown in dry lean soils.  May self seed.  Butterflies!
Coreopsis palmata    Plains coreopsis
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade     Z: 3-8    Famly: Asteraceae
Prairie coreopsis is a rhizomatous (spreading from roots) wildflower native to much of the eastern U. S.  Bright yellow flowers on 1 1/2 to 2' plants that do well in poor, rocky, well drained soils.  Butterflies & birds
Coreopsis pubescens   Star tickseed   Photos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun    Zones 3-8    Family: Asteraceae
An ideal prairie or meadow plant, star tickseed stays low and has a mounding habit. Star tickseed not only attracts butterflies in summer but feeds small seed eating birds in fall & winter.  Drought tolerant.Butterflies!
Coreopsis tripteris   Tall tickseed
$8.00 Quart   $12.00 3 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun    Zones 3-8    Family: Asteraceae
An ideal prairie or meadow plant, tall tickseed can get from 2 feet to 6 feet, dependings on soils & moisture.  Another lovely member of the Aster Family, tall tickseed not only attracts butterflies in summer but feeds small seed eating birds in fall & winter.  I always feel a surge of joy when I see an Indigo bunting with its feet clasped on the stem pecking at the dried flowerheads. Butterflies!
Coreopsis verticillata   Threadleaf coreopsis 
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun    Zones 4-8    Family: Asteraceae
Threadleaf coreopsis is a bushy rhizomatous perennial that can take the heat & drought fairly well. Long bloom time Butterflies!
Cunila origanoides  Dittany
$10.00 quart
Arkansas native
Shade    Zones 5-9  FAmily: Lamiacea
A diminutive member of the mint family, Dittany is sometimes called wild oregano as the scent is much the same. Growing 9 to 18 inches, I usually see dittany in deciduous woods but have read that it will grow in full sun. Dittany has been used medicinally by Native Americans & others throughout the years. A nice tea can be made by steeping the leaves.
Cynanchum laeve   Honeyvine
$10.00 quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade    Zones 3-9  FAmily: Asclepidaceae
Honeyvine is a perennial twining vine that dies to the ground in the winter, springing up when the weather warms again.  Honeyvine is somewhat weedy and so you wouldn't want it in a formal garden but it works well in a large pot-   We have a couple planted in 5 gallon pots here at the nursery.  White, lightly fragrant flowers appear in summer.  Host plant for Monarchs & the Obcure sphinx.  Seed thanks to Don Ford & John Perrin.
Service & packaging top-rate.  Excellent plants!  Thank you.  JJ- Oklahoma
Dalea candida    White prairie cloverPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun  Zones: 3-8     Family: Fabaceae  Synonym: Petalostemum candidum
White prairie clover is native to most of the United States, it reaches about 12" to 24" in height.  The bloom time comes about May or June, is drought tolerant & long lived when planted in full sun and well drained soil.
Dalea purpurea    Purple prairie cloverPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun    Z: 4-8    Family: Fabaceae     Synonym: Petalostemum purpureum
Bright purple flowers that look like a ballerina's tutu appear in late spring on erect short (12") stems.  Very drought tolerant & hardy.
Dasyliron wheeleri    Sotol / Desert spoonPhotos
$12.00 Quart   $20.00 #2
Native
Sun Z: 6(5) - 10  Family: Liliaceae
An outstanding drought buster!  This member of the lily family has hooked spines on the leaves - so pet it gently.  Blue-gray leaves cascade fountain-like & when the plant gets large enough, it will produce a flower spike up to 12' tall.  Deer resistant!  I have grown this in a south facing bank for over 20 years & it just keeps getting better each year.
Do you know that many garden pesticides contain neonicotinoides?  So why should you care?  Neonicotinoides are a major cause of death in bees.  Almost all systemic pesticides contain these Neonicotinoides.  So, the sunflower you bought at your local nursery or big box store may just be toxic to the bees you want to pollinate your crops.
Dennstaedtia punctilobula       Hay scented fern
$sold out
Arkansas native
Shade/morning sun  Zones 3-8  Family: Dennstaedtiaceae
Hay scented fern grows aggressively in moist organic soils but tolerates less desirable sites as well. Its common name indicates fragrant foliage when brushed against or cut. 1 ½ to 2 feet in height, hay-scented fern will grow in heavy shade but can even tolerate full sun if the soil is moist enough.
Desmanthus illinoisensis      Bundleflower
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to light shade  Zones 5-9  Family: Fabaceae
Similar looking to sensitive briar, this wildflower does not have prickles however and has fine long stamens projecting from each flower so it looks like a white puffball. Sun/light shade. Important food for wildlife. Native range is from Texas to Indiana.  3-4"
Dicentra exima  Bleeding heartPhotos
$sold out
Native
Shade, Morning sun/afternoon shade.    Zone 4-8    Family: Fumariaceae
Ferny foliage that does not die to the ground in the summer is one of the marked differences between this & some of the other species.  Dangling pink flowers in spring, often reblooming later in summer.    Adequate moisture 
Echinacea is in the Asteraceae family.  We have a number of species of these and the hybridizers have really been busy working on colors, sizes & shapes.  We mostly prefer to grow straight species.  Generally these coneflowers prefer a place in the sun, well drained soil & little if any fertilizer.  Bees, butterflies & other flying critters love coneflowers. According to one customer, Goldfinches avidly pick the seedheads clean before seed matures.
Echinacea atrorubens   Reflexed coneflower
$sold out
Native (OK,KS,TX)
Sun   Zones 5-9.    Family: Asteraceae
Seed thanks to Marilyn Stewart. 3’ tall, dark pink flowers.Butterflies
Echinacea pallida    Pale purple coneflowerPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade    Zones 3-8.    Family: Asteraceae
Native to much of the U.S & Arkansas, this coneflowers has pale drooping petals.  Lightly fragrant with spidery petals.  Very drought tolerant & increases both vegetatively & by seed.   Butterflies
Echinacea paradoxa     Yellow coneflowerPhotos
sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade     Zones 5 to 9    Family: Asteraceae
A paradox indeed! A yellow Echinacea. The yellow rays are strongly downturned with the disc dark brown. This lovely native is not widespread but is found on rocky slopes in Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma & Texas. Perennial. Usually found in limestone country but will growjust fine in my acidic soil.  Drought tolerant & long lived.  butterflies
Echinacea purpurea  TT    Purple coneflower TT Photos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native   Sun/part shade  Zone: 4-9  Family: Asteraceae
A lovely purple coneflower - which is really a stunning pink - seeds thanks to Teresa Thrash!  This coneflower has narrower leaves than usual as well as being shorter & more floriferous.
Echinacea purpurea   Purple coneflowerPhotos
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native  Sun/part shade  Zone 4-9  Family: Asteraceae
Here we have the normal purple coneflower that is tall and has large flowers.  Very attractive to butterflies, bees & other flying critters.
Thanks to John Perrin for the seed.
Echinacea sanguinea      Sanguine coneflowerPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to light shade  Z: 7-10  Family: Asteraceae
Thanks to Theo Witsell for sharing the seed for this uncommon coneflower - native to three states, Arkansas, Oklahoma & Texas.  I am not certain of the winter hardiness of this species - It's natural growing area is Zone 8 and warmer.
Echinacea simulata      Glade coneflower
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade  Z: 5-8  Family: Asteraceae
Glade coneflower looks almost exactly like pale purple coneflower with the exception that the pollen is yellow whereas with pale purple coneflower, the pollen is white. Growing conditions are similar-rocky, poor soils as well as somewhat better (but not too good) soil. Great attractor of butterflies, bees &seed eating birds
Echinacae tennessensis  Tennessee Coneflower Photos
$8.00 Quart
 Native
Sun to partial shade  Zones 4-9  Family: Asteraceae
Tennessee coneflower has reflexed petals instead of the typical downturned petals of most coneflowers.  Tennessee coneflower was once almost on the edge of extinction but through the efforts of many folks, it has rebounded & I understand to be in good shape.  It grows in well drained sandy soils here.
Erigeron pulchellus v. pulchellus   Robin's plantain  Photos
$sold out
Arkansas native
Part shade  Z: 3-8  Family: Asteraceae
Robin's plantain is an early spring blooming darling with daisy-like flowers of whte with a tinge of pink or blue.  Their quarter sized blooms endear themselves to gardeners with their undemanding beauty.  Drought tolerant.
Eryngium yuccifolium     RattlesnakemasterPhotos
$mid summer 2017
Arkansas native  Sun to part shade. Zones 5-9  Family: Asteraceae
An unusual looking whitish flower top blue gray foliage that looks similar to yucca.  Found over most of the eastern part of the U.S., rattlesnakemaster was used by the American Indians for a multitude of medicinal purposes - one of which was to make a poultice of the root to apply to snakebites.  Now-a-days, using it as a vertical accent in the garden to attract butterflies is the most common use.
Eupatorium coelestinum    Mistflower
 $8.00 Quart    $12.00 3 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade    Zones 5-10   Family: Asteraceae
Lovely blue flowers bloom in late summer & fall, attracting bees and butterflies. Very aggressive spreader though. Average to moist soils.
Eupatorium fistulosum    Joe Pye Weed
 $8.00 Quart    $12.00 3 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade    Zones 4-10   Family: Asteraceae
This giant Joe Pye weed draws butterflies like a magnet with large pinky mauve flowers on very stiff stems.  Plan on 6 to 10 feet for this lovely mid to late summer bloomer.
Eupatorium fistulosum v. albidum   White joe pye weed
$12.00 3 Quart size
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade  Zone 4-10 Famiy: Asteraceae
Butterflies are drawn to the Joe Pye weed members - There must be an abundance of nectar in the huge flower heads. this one gets big too, with clusters of white flowers.  6-10'.
Eupatorium hyssopifolium    Hyssop leaved boneset
$sold out
Arkansas Native
Sun to part shade  Zones 4-8   Family: Asteraceae
I feel like stealing some of Tony Avent's comments & asking for a better common name!  It is a shame for this underused native to be burdened with a name only a mother could love.  Very fine foliage graces this late summer blooming texture plant.  Good nectar plant for butterflies.  White flowers.
Eupatorium incarnatum   Purple boneset
$out
Arkansas native
Part Shade  Z: 5-9  Family: Asteraceae
Syn: Fleischmannia incarnata.  Also known as pink thoroughwort, Eupatorium incarnatum is valued by butterflies for its nectar & is used as a larval food plant by some of the metalmarks.  Found in Arkansas in shaded areas with seasonal moisture.
Eupatorium maculatum   Joe pye weed  Photos
   $12.00 3 Quart size
Arkansas Native
Sun to part shade   Zones 5-9     Family: Asteraceae
Joe Pye weed is an  outstanding butterfly plant!  Dusty rose colored flowers top off an imposing plant from 3 to 9 feet tall (if it's really happy).  Normally gets to about 4-6'.  Joe Pye likes good soil & adequate moisture.  Bloom period is late summer into fall. 
Eupatorium perfoliatum     Boneset
$8.00 Quart 
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade  Zones 4-9    Family: Asteraceae
The long narrow leaves clasp the stem so tightly that it appears the stem has grown through the leaves.  Puffy white flower heads adorn this native meadow plant that get from 3 to 5'.  Very attractive to butterflies but it is poisonous to cattle.  While liking moisture, it is quite drought tolerant when established.
Eupatorium purpureum    Joe Pye weedPhotos
$8.00 Quart 
Arkansas native
Sun/shade  Zones 3-8  Family: Asteraceae
Butterfly attractor!  Lovely pinky-purple flowers heads rise tall in the mid summer garden.  Average to moist soils.  New name (Eutrochium purpureum) to some folks.
Eupatorium rugosum  White snakeroot
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade   Zones 5-8   Family: Asteraceae
Just another butterfly attractor!  Butterflies need nectar sources all season long which is a good reason for planting white snakeroot.  (Why snakeroot?  Does the root look like a snake?  How many white snakes have you seen?)  At nearly 4' tall, white snakeroot doesn't get lost in the crowd.
Eupatorium serotinum     Late Joe Pye
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade   Z: 3-9  Family: Asteraceae
Deep purple stems are a vivid contrast to the deep green of the foliage.  This contrast is most vivid early in the season.  Toward the end of summer, late Joe Pye is covered in white blooms, attracting flying critters from near & far.  Another drought buster!  Butterflies!
Medium perennial pots are 3 7/8 x 3 7/8 x 4"
Filipendula rubra   Queen of the Prairie
$sold out
Native
Sun  Z: 3-8  Family: Rosaceae
Queen of the prairie seems rightly named – 6 to 8 feet tall, fragrant in both flower & leaf. Fluffy looking pink flower heads show up in summer. Average to moist soils. Deer resistant & will tolerate clay soil. Butterflies & birds and other pollinating insects.
Gaillardia aestivalis v. aestivalis  BlanketflowerPhotos
$out
Arkansas Native
Sun/part shade  Z: 5-9  Family: Asteraceae
There are several different plants referred to as Blanketflower.  This one grows 2 to 3 feet and has flowers of mostly red with some yellow on the edges of the petals.  Thanks to Theo Witsell for this seed.
Gaillardia aestivalis v. flavovirens  Blanketflower Photos
$sold out 
Arkansas Native
Sun/part shade  Z: 5-9  Family: Asteraceae
Thanks to Marilyn Stewart (Wild Things Nursery) for the seed of this lovely blanketflower.  Beautiful yellow flowers that bloom for months.  I do believe this can act as an annual or short lived perennial.  If annual, new plants pop up & you will have flowers by July.
Gaura lindheimeri   Wand flower  Photos
$sold out
Native
Sun/part shade  Z: 5-9  Family: Onagraceae
Native to Texas & Louisiana, Wand flower or Appleblossom grass (as I saw it referred to lately) is a delightful long blooming perennial.  Four petaled white flowers with long stamens seem to dance in the slightest breeze - also gaining it the name of whirling butterflies.
Geranium maculatum  Wild geraniumPhotos
$sold out
Arkansas native   Shade or morning sun Z: 3-8  Family: Geraniaceae
Lovely woodland native with pink flowers about 1/2 dollar size.  Blooms in mid spring.  Deeply incised leaves make this plant lovely even when not in bloom.
Gillenia stipulata   Indian physic
$8.00 Quart
Arkansas native
Morning sun/light shade  Zones  5-9     Family: Rosaceae   Synonym: Porteranthus stipulatus
Synonym: Poteranthus stipulatus.     When I was at the butterfly festival this year on Mt. Magazine, at the visitor center, I saw many of these starry white flowers on the edge of dry woods.  So cheerful blooming in late June!  Native from New York to Texas.
Gillenia trifoliata   Indian physic
$sold out
Arkansas native
Sun to part shade  Zones  4-8     Family: Rosaceae   Synonym: Porteranthus trifoliatus
Synonym: Poteranthus trifoliatus.
    Bowman’s root generally grows 2 to 3’ with a similar spread, it does well massed taking advantage of the airiness of the blooms & showing off the red calyx after the petals have dropped. Attractive to Butterflies
Glandularia canadensis    Rose verbenaPhotos
$summer 2017
Arkansas native
Sun/part shade  Z: 5-9  Family: Verbenaceae
A trailing plant that spreads quickly to form a lovely ground cover.  Flat-topped clusters of deep pink to rose-purple flowers appear for several months from early spring in summer.  A great butterfly attractor that also does well in containers.  Average to dry soil that is well drained.
You see purple verbena growing on roadsides in tough conditions.
Butterflies!
"We cannot live only for ourselves.  A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men; and among those fibers, as sympathetic threads, our actions run as causes, and they come back to us as effects."   Herman Melville